Mexican Tarragon

Mexican Tarragon

Mexican Tarragon (Tagetes lucida) is a beautiful addition to any herb garden. The leaves are often used as a tarragon substitute (hence the name), and the vibrant yellow flowers bloom well into late summer, and can perk up an otherwise drab landscape. The flowers are also known as Mexican Marigolds, and are an important symbol in the annual Día de los Muertos festivities, where they are placed on the graves of family members as ofrendas, or offerings. The flowers are often depicted in Huichol art, and are used to create a vibrant yellow dye.

The herb is a remedy of the Curanderos, who use it make a tea infusion for treating the common cold. It is also dried and burned as ceremonial incense, and as an insect repellant. But, most commonly, it is used as a spice — it has a flavor quite similar to tarragon, with a touch of anise. It adds a complimentary, savory flavor to eggs and other meat dishes.

As a plant, it is much more heat-tolerant than tarragon, and is often grown in its stead in warmer climates, where tarragon does not thrive.Although it is treated like an annual in regions with cold winters, it is really a half-hardy perennial in areas with warmer winters. The plant itself might die down, but will sprout back from the roots when the spring comes.

Mexican Tarragon is now available to add to your garden. You can find all of our available varieties by browsing under Herbs:

Tarragon

Tarragon

Tarragon (Asteraceae Artemisia dracunculus) makes a great companion plant for gardens. The scent and taste of tarragon is disliked by many garden pests, and it does a good job of repelling them naturally. It is also reputed to be a nurse plant — a plant which enhances growth and flavor of companion crops. While Russian Tarragon is easier to grow than French Tarragon because it is hardier, more vigorous and can be grown from seed, it is also much milder in flavor and for this reason it is rarely grown as a culinary herb. For French Tarragon, it is better to purchase plant starts or root cuttings.

Tarragon is one of the four fines herbes used in French cooking, along with parsley, chives and chervil. Tarragon’s delicate flavor is particularly well-suited for chicken, fish, and egg dishes. In fact, tarragon is one of the main components of Béarnaise sauce. But it also is a delightfully delicate flavor-surprise when paired with citrus, in a citrus salad, in an orange-tarragon sauce over salmon, and in this ambrosial sorbet.

Grapefruit Tarragon Sorbet
(Adapted from Gourmet)

2 cups grapefruit juice
1 cup sugar
1 cup water
1 tsp dried tarragon, crumbled

Bring sugar, water and dried Tarragon to a boil. Once the sugar has dissolved allow it to simmer for 5 more minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from heat and whisk in grapefruit juice. Churn in an ice cream maker. Once complete, transfer sorbet into an airtight container place in the freezer to harden even more.

If you don’t have an ice cream maker, place in an airtight container in the freezer. Allow to chill, stirring every 30 minutes. It will take roughly 2 hours until the consistency gets thick. Keep in an airtight container.

Will keep 1 week in freezer.